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Microphones and Acoustics

Frequently Asked Questions

Get your most commonly asked acoustics questions answered.

Section I: Definitions and Terminology
Section II: Microphone Recommendations
Section III: Calibration and Testing
Section IV: Specification Clarifications
Section V: Specialty Microphone Applications
Section VI: Maintenance and Handling

If you don’t see the answer to your question, call our 24/7 SensorLineSM 716-684-0001 to speak with an application engineer or visit Ask the Acoustics Experts.

We previously used low cost vocal music microphones and are looking at upgrading to test and measurement microphones. What are the basic differences and advantages?

A low cost microphone for musicians is designed to be ‘colorful.’ Certain frequency bands have been accentuated to make the response pleasing to the ear. Unfortunately, some of the tolerances of musical microphones are typically very wide (e.g., +/- 10 dB.) A test and measurement microphone will have a wider usable frequency bandwidth, better noise floor and a greater amplitude measurement range. More importantly, test and measurement microphones allow the user to accurately measure the amplitude at certain frequencies within a specified tolerance (typically +/- 1 or +/-2 dB).

We previously used low cost vocal music microphones and are looking at upgrading to test and measurement microphones. What are the basic differences and advantages?

A low cost microphone for musicians is designed to be ‘colorful.’ Certain frequency bands have been accentuated to make the response pleasing to the ear. Unfortunately, some of the tolerances of musical microphones are typically very wide (e.g., +/- 10 dB.) A test and measurement microphone will have a wider usable frequency bandwidth, better noise floor and a greater amplitude measurement range. More importantly, test and measurement microphones allow the user to accurately measure the amplitude at certain frequencies within a specified tolerance (typically +/- 1 or +/-2 dB).