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Microphones and Acoustics

Frequently Asked Questions

Get your most commonly asked acoustics questions answered.

Section I: Definitions and Terminology
Section II: Microphone Recommendations
Section III: Calibration and Testing
Section IV: Specification Clarifications
Section V: Specialty Microphone Applications
Section VI: Maintenance and Handling

If you don’t see the answer to your question, call our 24/7 SensorLineSM 716-684-0001 to speak with an application engineer or visit Ask the Acoustics Experts.

I want to flush mount a microphone in a pipe. I understand that problems can arise from improper venting. What consideration should be given to venting and what can be done to prevent improper venting?

Microphones can be mounted flush to a tube wall, but avoid covering the vent hole. The vent hole allows for equalization of pressure. With the vent hole closed, calibration and start-up will take much longer due to the extra time required for the microphone to stabilize through the internal vent path. If the pressure inside the pipe is different from outside the pipe, you may get inaccurate test results. Using a front vented microphone or a small capillary tube on a rear vented microphone, to equalize the pressure from the microphone side (inside the pipe) to behind the backplane, through the preamplifier vent is recommended. This will ensure faster start up and more accurate test results.

I want to flush mount a microphone in a pipe. I understand that problems can arise from improper venting. What consideration should be given to venting and what can be done to prevent improper venting?

Microphones can be mounted flush to a tube wall, but avoid covering the vent hole. The vent hole allows for equalization of pressure. With the vent hole closed, calibration and start-up will take much longer due to the extra time required for the microphone to stabilize through the internal vent path. If the pressure inside the pipe is different from outside the pipe, you may get inaccurate test results. Using a front vented microphone or a small capillary tube on a rear vented microphone, to equalize the pressure from the microphone side (inside the pipe) to behind the backplane, through the preamplifier vent is recommended. This will ensure faster start up and more accurate test results.