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Microphones and Acoustics

Frequently Asked Questions

Get your most commonly asked acoustics questions answered.

Section I: Definitions and Terminology
Section II: Microphone Recommendations
Section III: Calibration and Testing
Section IV: Specification Clarifications
Section V: Specialty Microphone Applications
Section VI: Maintenance and Handling

If you don’t see the answer to your question, call our 24/7 SensorLineSM 716-684-0001 to speak with an application engineer or visit Ask the Acoustics Experts.

When measuring sound with test and measurement microphones do I need to be in an anechoic chamber?

Anechoic chambers allow measurement of low noise levels without reflections. Whether an anechoic chamber is needed depends on the application, what is being measured, and the environment. Anechoic chambers are generally required when you need to make free-field measurements in applications free of objects that could reflect sound. This is particularly true at lower frequencies where a large amount of space is required to obtain a free-field. Anechoic chambers have a lower limiting frequency that is determined by the absorption characteristics. Most anechoic chambers for acoustic measurements have a lower limiting frequency well below 1 kHz. In cases where the signal to noise ratio is sufficiently high, an anechoic chamber may not be necessary.

When measuring sound with test and measurement microphones do I need to be in an anechoic chamber?

Anechoic chambers allow measurement of low noise levels without reflections. Whether an anechoic chamber is needed depends on the application, what is being measured, and the environment. Anechoic chambers are generally required when you need to make free-field measurements in applications free of objects that could reflect sound. This is particularly true at lower frequencies where a large amount of space is required to obtain a free-field. Anechoic chambers have a lower limiting frequency that is determined by the absorption characteristics. Most anechoic chambers for acoustic measurements have a lower limiting frequency well below 1 kHz. In cases where the signal to noise ratio is sufficiently high, an anechoic chamber may not be necessary.