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Microphones and Acoustics

Frequently Asked Questions

Get your most commonly asked acoustics questions answered.

Section I: Definitions and Terminology
Section II: Microphone Recommendations
Section III: Calibration and Testing
Section IV: Specification Clarifications
Section V: Specialty Microphone Applications
Section VI: Maintenance and Handling

If you don’t see the answer to your question, call our 24/7 SensorLineSM 716-684-0001 to speak with an application engineer or visit Ask the Acoustics Experts.

What is TEDS?

TEDS (Transducer Electronic Data Sheet) is a chip that stores traceability data on a sensor. The TEDS chips for microphones are housed within the preamplifier and can be programmed in a 0.9 format or a 1.0 format. This is especially useful in large groups of microphones to tell sensor location. The PCB 130xXX sensors and the higher quality 378xXX systems are programmed with 1.0 and are be discussed below.

A TEDS chip is a small component that stores data about the sensor. Think of it as a miniature version of a USB thumb drive for your computer, with a formatted template. This will contain information about the sensor including the model number, serial number, calibration date, polarization, etc.

The standard is governed by the IEEE. You typically will see either an IEEE (P)1451.4 or an IEEE 1451.4. Within these versions are different ID template numbers that are designated for different sensors. TEDS can be read with a reader, or read and programmed with the appropriate TEDS writer software.

The “P” prefix for the IEEE (P)1451.4 stands for preliminary and is the 0.9 version for our microphone and preamplifier combinations. The most common ID template for our microphones is template 12: microphone, integrated preamplifier. Template 16 is a preamplifier only template and will come programmed if the preamp is ordered separate. If a system (microphone and preamplifier) is ordered together, the preamplifier alone template (16) gets deleted and the other mic and preamp template takes precedence and appears upon turn-on of the TEDS reader. Below is an example of 0.9.

An example of our screenshot utilizing The Modal Shops 400B76 read/write software, is shown below. The preliminary format for the TEDS IEEE P1451.4 in place forced manufacturers to adhere to column constraints. Thus, Model number is ONLY the first three letters, version is the rev letter and the last two digits are the version number. The template truncates the preceding 0 for model, see below. The model below is 378B02. Also shown are the serial number, calibration date, sensitivity, whether it is prepolarized (1) or externally polarized (0). The ASCII section allows customer notes to be placed.

For version 1.0 (IEEE 14.51.4) we utilize templates #27 and #28 for microphones.

In version 1.0 they expanded the template and have additional information, for example the field type and mic size.

It is important to note that if a customer purchases a 0.9 formatted unit, we can always reprogram that into a 1.0 TEDS format. But once programmed in 1.0, end users can’t switch it back to a 0.9 format. This is why we err on side of caution and our higher quality; more expensive 378 systems are programmed in 0.9. If a customer is not sure what system they use, either look up past history to see if they purchased the 378xXX (0.9) or the TLD378xXX (1.0) programmed units.

Accelerometers have different templates and some specific for use with LMS software that can have TLA, TLB and TLC in our part numbers to designate which template we program.

If an end user has an issue reading TEDS, first ask if they have a TEDS reader and what make and model and if they are set-up to read 0.9 or 1.0 versions.

What is TEDS?

TEDS (Transducer Electronic Data Sheet) is a chip that stores traceability data on a sensor. The TEDS chips for microphones are housed within the preamplifier and can be programmed in a 0.9 format or a 1.0 format. This is especially useful in large groups of microphones to tell sensor location. The PCB 130xXX sensors and the higher quality 378xXX systems are programmed with 1.0 and are be discussed below.

A TEDS chip is a small component that stores data about the sensor. Think of it as a miniature version of a USB thumb drive for your computer, with a formatted template. This will contain information about the sensor including the model number, serial number, calibration date, polarization, etc.

The standard is governed by the IEEE. You typically will see either an IEEE (P)1451.4 or an IEEE 1451.4. Within these versions are different ID template numbers that are designated for different sensors. TEDS can be read with a reader, or read and programmed with the appropriate TEDS writer software.

The “P” prefix for the IEEE (P)1451.4 stands for preliminary and is the 0.9 version for our microphone and preamplifier combinations. The most common ID template for our microphones is template 12: microphone, integrated preamplifier. Template 16 is a preamplifier only template and will come programmed if the preamp is ordered separate. If a system (microphone and preamplifier) is ordered together, the preamplifier alone template (16) gets deleted and the other mic and preamp template takes precedence and appears upon turn-on of the TEDS reader. Below is an example of 0.9.

An example of our screenshot utilizing The Modal Shops 400B76 read/write software, is shown below. The preliminary format for the TEDS IEEE P1451.4 in place forced manufacturers to adhere to column constraints. Thus, Model number is ONLY the first three letters, version is the rev letter and the last two digits are the version number. The template truncates the preceding 0 for model, see below. The model below is 378B02. Also shown are the serial number, calibration date, sensitivity, whether it is prepolarized (1) or externally polarized (0). The ASCII section allows customer notes to be placed.

For version 1.0 (IEEE 14.51.4) we utilize templates #27 and #28 for microphones.

In version 1.0 they expanded the template and have additional information, for example the field type and mic size.

It is important to note that if a customer purchases a 0.9 formatted unit, we can always reprogram that into a 1.0 TEDS format. But once programmed in 1.0, end users can’t switch it back to a 0.9 format. This is why we err on side of caution and our higher quality; more expensive 378 systems are programmed in 0.9. If a customer is not sure what system they use, either look up past history to see if they purchased the 378xXX (0.9) or the TLD378xXX (1.0) programmed units.

Accelerometers have different templates and some specific for use with LMS software that can have TLA, TLB and TLC in our part numbers to designate which template we program.

If an end user has an issue reading TEDS, first ask if they have a TEDS reader and what make and model and if they are set-up to read 0.9 or 1.0 versions.